Jan 08, 2016 3:55PM

Meet Manon's Friends: The NY Kids Who Wanna Change The World

Forever yung.

Manon Macasaet is a cool chick living in NYC who spends her time hanging out with a bunch of young guys and girls who're making things happen. We asked her to intro us to a few of her pals, and she more than came through with the goods — getting deep with musician Telana, Gabe of art collective Uzi (who specialise in VHS video that's made collaborators of people like Kreayshawn and Kid Cudi), Kerwin Frost of art/DJ collective Spaghetti Boys and designer/qt Bria Rene Scott.

Her crew may be considered kids but they've got mad skills and ambitious attitudes that aren't to be fucked with. Get familiar below.

Name: Gabe of Uzi.

Age: 999 years old.

Where are you from?
Space.

What do you do?
Musician/director/alien.

What inspires you most?
Knowing that kids worldwide care about the stuff we're doing.

How important is the internet to your day-to-day life?
The internet is everything. It's how we make a living. It's everything.

What do you want to be when you grow up?
No plans on ever growing up actually.

What's the biggest positive and negative of growing up?
It's hard to say. Some days we're kids, some days we're adults, that's probably how it's always gonna be. We act how we want when we want to, we don't care about what society thinks a grown up is. We smoke weed and eat hella candy and watch cartoons all day long like children. But, on the other hand, there are times I make thousands of dollars for an hour or two of work. Nobody can tell you that you to stop acting like a kid if you're making bread like a grown up.

What's your idea of utopia? 
On Rodeo Drive, riding in a Uber BLACK SUV, eating chipotle with Amanda Bynes and Paris Hilton, smoking blunt after blunt, all of us wearing Burberry head to toe, listening to Young Thug — 'Best Friend'.

Any personal beliefs or values that are meaningful to you?
Too many. Who cares what we think though.

The end of your world would be:
Never. The planet I'm from, we never die. We live eternally, so luckily I don't really got to think about that too much.

How would you describe your artistic output?
I think it's really sick. I don't know, we just kinda make cool stuff. We're really big on communication with the audience and telling a story.

***

Name: Telana

Age: 19!

Where are you from? 
Earth, currently.

What do you do? 
Creation through all mediums, with music as the focal point.

What inspires you most? 
Childhood.

How important is the internet to your day-to-day life? 
As important as it is in any other teen's life in 2015. I see the internet as a resource and social media as a medium, both of which simply facilitate the delivery of my message. I believe it is important to understand and define the power struggle technology has with life — control technology but don't let technology control you. 

How would you describe your artistic output? 
Incredibly random and sporadic. I make the best art when it comes from the need to survive. 

What do you want to be when you grow up?
I want to be happy. 

What's your idea of utopia?
My ideal setting is a newborn organic Earth. Imagine what fruits tasted like!

Any personal beliefs or values that are meaningful to you? 
I believe in angels and the power of colour coding.

The end of your world would be:
We'll see. 

***

Name: Kerwin Frost

Age: 15

Where are you from?
Kingsland, Texas — a small town two hours outside of Austin.

What do you do?
I mean, me and the fellas started off selling candy at school, but we've been rocking as the Spaghetti Boys for a while now. Spaghetti Boys is the future.

What inspires you most?
Smell, there are just certain smells that evoke strong emotions from me, such as the scents wafting from Grandmama's kitchen. I remember helping her knead the dough for vegetable dumplings and feeling such accomplishment while I enjoyed the meal.

How important is the internet to your day-to-day life?
I really don't pay much mind to the web, people be talking on Twitter, but I don't pay attention to all that. 

What's the biggest positive and negative of growing up?
When my best friend died, that's when I really started going hard, you feel me? I was just thinking like, "Damn, life is short. I gotta make this shit work. It's not a choice. This is for Brandon." 

What's your idea of utopia?
Just a spot where me and the homies can smoke and kick it, a place where we can just escape the hood, because coming from the hood, being gay wasn't really an option for us. You either hooped or sold drugs, that's just how it was.

Any personal beliefs or values that are meaningful to you?
If the red river is running, take the dusty trail home.

The end of your world would be:
If Norman Birdwell passed. I grew up on Clifford, that's my childhood. 

***

Name: Bria Rene Scott 

Age: 22

Where are you from? 
South Jamaica, Queens.

What do you do? 
I'm a final year fashion design student at FIT and a design/production intern at Creatures of Comfort.

What inspires you most? 
Looking at the current state of affairs and finding points in history that seem relative. I look to those points in time for any hints of nostalgia I feel should be preserved, and any lessons that should be taken with us into the future. I'm obsessed with our future, where we're going and how we will dress for it. I have this constant feeling a new world is on its way. Everyone thinks the world is ending for good but I think it is ending as we've known it for a couple of millennia.

What's the biggest positive and negative of growing up?
The biggest positive is probably the freedom you have to do just about anything, be who you want to be and go anywhere without consulting your parents! The biggest negative is how differently I'm experiencing spacetime, it's moving so fast. I think young children experience spacetime so much slower than adults do, and I am trying to hold on to that. 

How would you describe your artistic output? 
Aesthetically, it is comfort and function, with a touch of nostalgia for things I find to have immense cultural value that need to be preserved for all generations. Conceptually, I aim to give voice to anyone marginalised — which lately has tied heavily to my urban experience growing up African American — but I hope to eventually give voice to anyone, anywhere who is ignored. Do you ever look around and everyone seems inexplicably mopey or sad, even when they have so much to be thankful for? I have a theory that this is because we are all connected. If one marginalised person exists anywhere we are all going to feel it. So in order for true happiness to exist we have to ensure that [happiness] is a right to all people, not just some. 

What's your idea of utopia? 
I'm in a cabin that exists in the most elaborate rooftop garden in either Queens or East London. There I have my sewing machine, dress form, drafting table and big comfy couch.

Any personal beliefs or values that are meaningful to you?
Just be a good and decent person, don't let life make you hard, and treat all people the same. No need for beef, personal vendettas or revenge, the universe takes care of bad people so we don't have to. Also flexing is cringeworthy and should die. 

The end of your world would be:
If Donald Trump became President. So don't let that happen, go vote!

Photography: Manon Macasaet